The 10 Best Science Timelapse Videos

Time-lapse photography fits very well for scientific purposes.
Check 10 stunning videos made by the most famous and skilled photorgaphers of the world.
Total duration: 41 min. 47 sec.

01. Earth
Science: Geography

Video by: Michael Konig
A little info:
Time lapse sequences of photographs taken by the crew of expeditions 28 & 29 onboard the International Space Station from August to October, 2011, who shot these pictures at an altitude of around 350 km.

02. A Supercell Near Booker, Texas
Science: Meteorology

Video by: Mike Olbinski
Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
A little info:
A supercell is a thunderstorm that is characterized by the presence of a mesocyclone: a deep, persistently rotating updraft. For this reason, these storms are sometimes referred to as rotating thunderstorms. Of the four classifications of thunderstorms (supercell, squall line, multi-cell, and single-cell), supercells are the overall least common and have the potential to be the most severe. Supercells are often isolated from other thunderstorms, and can dominate the local weather up to 32 kilometres (20 miles) away.

03. Ice Crystals
Science: Physics

Video by: Shawn Knol
Camera: Canon EOS 500D
A little info:
Timelapse video of ice crystals melting, photographed using cross-polarized light.

04. The Mold (Aspergillus Fumigatus Botrytis Mucor Trichoderma Cladosporium)
Science: Biology

Video by: Lariontsev Nick
Camera: Nikon D70s
A little info:
A mold or mould is a fungus that grows in the form of multicellular filaments called hyphae. In contrast, fungi that can adopt a single-celled growth habit are called yeasts. Molds are a large and taxonomically diverse number of fungal species where the growth of hyphae results in discoloration and a fuzzy appearance, especially on food. The network of these tubular branching hyphae, called a mycelium, is considered a single organism.

05. Calbuco
Science: Geography, Volcanology

Video by: Martin Heck | Timestorm Films
Camera: Sony Alpha 7S, Canon EOS 6D, Pentax 645Z
A little info:
Calbuco is a volcano in southern Chile, and close to the cities of Puerto Varas and Puerto Montt. With an elevation of 2,015 meters above sea level, the volcano and the surrounding area are protected within the Llanquihue National Reserve. The most recent eruption of Calbuco that happened on April 22, 2015, followed by two smaller eruptions on April 24 and April 30. This was Calbuco’s first activity since 1972.

06. Snowtime
Science: Physics, Meteorology

Video by: Slava Ivanov
A little info:
Snowflakes form in a wide variety of intricate shapes, leading to the popular expression that “no two are alike”. Although possible, it is very unlikely. Initial attempts to find identical snowflakes by photographing thousands of them with a microscope from 1885 onward by Wilson Alwyn Bentley found the wide variety of snowflakes we know about today. In 1988, Nancy Knight was documenting snowflakes for the National Center for Atmospheric Research and found two identical snowflakes of the hollow column type.

07. The 2013 Geminids Meteor Shower over Joshua Tree
Science: Astronomy

Video by: Henry Jun Wah Lee / Evosia
Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark II, Canon EOS 5D Mark III, Canon EOS 6D
A little info:
The Geminids are a meteor shower caused by the object 3200 Phaethon, which is thought to be a Palladian asteroid with a “rock comet” orbit. This would make the Geminids, together with the Quadrantids, the only major meteor showers not originating from a comet. The meteors from this shower are slow moving, can be seen in December and usually peak around December 13–14, with the date of highest intensity being the morning of December 14. The shower is thought to be intensifying every year and recent showers have seen 120–160 meteors per hour under optimal conditions, generally around 02:00 to 03:00 local time.

08. Monsoon
Science: Meteorology

Video by: Mike Olbinski
Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark III
A little info:
Monsoon is traditionally defined as a seasonal reversing wind accompanied by corresponding changes in precipitation, but is now used to describe seasonal changes in atmospheric circulation and precipitation associated with the asymmetric heating of land and sea. Usually, the term monsoon is used to refer to the rainy phase of a seasonally changing pattern, although technically there is also a dry phase.

09. Shifting Time – Water & Ice
Science: Physics

Video by: Daniel Kelly Brown
A little info:
A short time lapse film featuring multiple day long ice formations in Colorado rivers.

10. Sun
Science: Astronomy

Video by: Michael Konig
A little info:
Edited time lapse sequences of the sun’s atmosphere observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft between 2011 and 2015. This montage features excerpts of 4K full-disk pictures in extreme ultraviolet channels, mainly using wavelengths of 30.4 nm (50,000 Kelvin) partially in combination with 17.1 nm (6.3*105 Kelvin),
and offers a glance at spicules, solar flares, filaments and an overview of the sun’s atmosphere.

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